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The National Bird of Prey Hospital has continued to see a large increase in birds admitted recently

PUBLISHED: 19:34 09 July 2012 | UPDATED: 21:36 20 February 2013

The National Bird of Prey Hospital has continued to see a large increase in birds admitted recently

The National Bird of Prey Hospital has continued to see a large increase in birds admitted recently

The heavy downpours, high winds and constant rain are continuing to cause havoc. With flash floods, gale force winds and continuous periods of bad weather the effects are being felt everywhere. The National Bird of Prey Hospital

The heavy downpours, high winds and constant rain are continuing to cause havoc. With flash floods, gale force winds and continuous periods of bad weather the effects are being felt everywhere. The National Bird of Prey Hospital has continued to see a large increase in birds admitted recently.


Kim Kirkbride, Head of Section for the National Bird of Prey Hospital said traditionally at this time of the year the number of patients admitted for treatment does increase. Usually this is caused by birds fledging and struggling to find food. However this year youngsters are coming in that are too young to leave the nest. By far the majority have been dislodged from their nests by the bad weather. On an average year we treat approximately 200 birds of prey but this year we will far exceed that number. Our resources are limited but we are coping

The Hawk Conservancy Trust, Visitor Centre, Sarson Lane, Weyhill, Andover, Hampshire, SP11 8DY


01264 773850


info@hawkconservancy.org


www.hawkconservancy.org

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