CHRISTMAS OFFER Subscribe for £25 today CLICK HERE

Ancient Wessex hillforts given new lease of life

PUBLISHED: 10:23 04 March 2019

Ramparts in profile on Hambledon Hill and the neolithic causeway © John Miller

Ramparts in profile on Hambledon Hill and the neolithic causeway © John Miller

© John MIller

Thirteen iron age hillforts to be given a new lease of life thanks to an award made to the National Trust by Postcode Earth Trust

Thirteen majestic iron age hillforts and 332 hectares of their surrounding landscape across Dorset and Wiltshire are to be given a new lease of life thanks to an award of £800k made to the National Trust by Postcode Earth Trust, raised by players of People’s Postcode Lottery.

A £100k from this generous award will help protect all 13 Scheduled Monuments which are of national importance not only for their archaeology but also their diverse fragile habitats, which are home to many rare butterfly species including the Duke of Burgundy and marsh fritillary.

The sites include Hambledon and Hod Hills, which date from 5,500 to 2,000 years ago. At Hambledon the defences can still be seen and, together with its three ramparts encircling the hill, is one of the most impressive archaeological earthworks in southern England. The other Dorset hillforts are Badbury Rings, Eggardon Hill, Pilsdon Pen, Lambert’s Castle and Coney’s Castle.

The work for these sites ranges from erosion repairs to paths and ramparts, to improving fencing so that cattle and sheep can graze. There will also be green hay spreading at some sites to enhance the diversity of wildflower populations.

More details at nationaltrust.org.uk

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Dorset